In 1872, the United States Government purchased land from the Cherokee Nation for the Osage tribe and it was then that the tribe moved to Indian Territory. At statehood, 1907, this Osage Reservation became Osage County, the largest county in Oklahoma. the name is a corruption by the French of the tribal name Wah-Sha-She. Pawhuska, the county seat, was named for Chief Pa-hue-Skah, which means white hair. Oil and gas as well as horse and cattle ranching on the famous bluestem grass, contribute to the economy of Osage County. Attractions to the county include Indian and western cultural activities, museums, recreational facilities, lakes, creeks, rivers, the Tall Grass Prairie Reserve north of Pawhuska, the Osage Tribal Museum and Headquarters in Pawhuska, and the Osage Hills State Park. Location: Osage County in northeastern Oklahoma. Climate: The average precipitation is 45.6 inches yearly in this area. January's average temperature is 40.6 degrees Fahrenheit and July's average is 79.6 degrees Fahrenheit. County Seat: Pawhuska Distances: Pawhuska to: Bartlesville - 26 miles Tulsa - 57 miles Land Area: 2,303 square miles of wide prairie make this ranching and agricultural county the largest in Oklahoma

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Osage County Interlocal Coop
Educational service organization designed to assist rural school districts in Osage, Noble and Kay counties with special services.
[Oklahoma Mozilla]
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December 22, 2016 at 4:45:07 UTC
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