Kingfisher County was originally a part of the Unassigned Lands opened for settlement during the Land Run of April 22, 1889. Created at statehood the county was named for King Fisher, a settler who operated a trading station on the Chisholm Trail. Kingfisher, also the name of the county seat, is the site of the Seay Mansion, restored home of Oklahoma's second territorial governor, A.J. Seay. Built in 1892, it features furnishings from that period. Also located in Kingfisher is the Chisholm Trail Museum, which traces the history of the Chisholm Trail and features Indian artifacts, and a restored log cabin, school house, church and bank. At one time, oil production in the Cashion Area, Dover Field, and East Columbia Field was of significant economic importance. Today, agriculture is central to the economy of the area, with wheat being the major crop. Annual events include Pat Hennessey Days during late August, PRCA sanctioned rodeo in June, Chisholm Trail Museum Barbecue on April 22, and Germanfest at Okarche in October. Location: Kingfisher County is in north central Oklahoma. Climate: The average precipitation is 47.1 inches yearly in this area. January's average temperature is 42.0 degrees Fahrenheit and July's average is 80.8 degrees Fahrenheit. County Seat: Kingfisher Distances: Kingfisher to: Enid - 38 miles Oklahoma City - 45 miles Land Area: 906 square miles of wide prairie

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The Political Graveyard: Kingfisher County, Oklahoma
Database provides political history, cemetery locations, and brief biographies of politicians who lived in the county.
[Oklahoma Mozilla]
Last update:
May 28, 2012 at 5:24:03 UTC
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