Harmon County, part of the original disputed Greer County claimed by both Texas and the United States, was created by special election in 1909, and named for Judson C. Harmon, a governor of Ohio and later U.S. Secretary of State. Located in extreme southwestern Oklahoma, the county is known today as the "Irrigation Center of the Southwest." Hollis is the county seat. The economy of the county is based largely on farming and ranching, with two contributing industries -- Western Fibers Insulation Plant, manufacturing insulation from recycled paper, and Buck Creed "Honey" Mesquite Company, Inc., processing mesquite for use as a flavor enhancer for barbecued meats. Lake Hall provides fishing and recreational opportunities for the area. The Black-Eyed Pea Festival is held annually during the second week in August. Two Harmon County history books , Planning the Route and Planning the Route 2, are available. Location: Harmon County borders on the Texas state line in southwestern Oklahoma. Climate: The average precipitation is 36.0 inches yearly in this area. January's average temperature is 41.8 degrees Fahrenheit and July's average is 81.1 degrees Fahrenheit. County Seat: Hollis Distances: Hollis to: Altus - 35 miles Lawton - 90 miles Oklahoma City - 182 miles Land Area: 538 square miles of rugged terrain, part hills and level plains

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