The sarangi is revered for its great flexibility of timbre and inflection, and the intensity of emotional expression to which it lends itself. A derivative of a folk fiddle, it entered Hindustani art music during the eighteenth century. The classical sarangi is carved out of a single piece of hardwood, and is between 64 and 67 centimeters long. It. It has three melody strings (usually made of gut) and around thirty-five metal sympathetic strings. The strings pass over and through a bridge made of bone or ivory. The bow, held with an underhand grip, is considerably heavier than Western violin or cello bows, contributing to the solidity and vocal quality of the sound. The instrument's tone and playability are largely determined by its setting up: placement and contouring of the bridges, thickness and height of the strings, and fitting of the pegs. These add up to an instrument notoriously difficult to play. The melody strings are stopped not with the pads of the fingers but with the cuticles or the upper nails or the skin above the nails of the left hand.

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Sangi Rangi
Provides instrument information and history, player archive, and research article. By Nicolas Magriel, performer, teacher and researcher.
[Mozilla Piper]
Last update:
December 22, 2015 at 13:32:26 UTC
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