G. K. Chesterton's book The Man Who Knew Too Much was published in 1922, later in the same year that he became a Catholic. These eight dark stories, featuring disillusioned government aide Horne Fisher and crusading journalist Harold March, besides being a collection of mysteries, are also meditations on justice and moral ambiguity in the British Empire on the eve of World War I. "The Hole in the Wall" is a particularly fine murder mystery which comments on the romanticizing of history by prosaic moderns--and which parts of history are not bathed in golden light. The book has a splendid and memorable last line. Chesterton's book has nothing to do with Alfred Hitchcock's two films of the same name.
The Man Who Knew Too Much
HTML. Each chapter has several pages. Links to previous and next page, previous and next chapter, table of contents. At Page by Page Books.
The Man Who Knew Too Much
In searchable HTML, at World Wide School. Each chapter has its own file, with links to previous, next, or any other chapter. In graphical browsers, this is the online equivalent of a "large print" edition.
The Man Who Knew Too Much
HTML, at Classic Reader. Searchable. Each chapter in its own file.
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